Note to Readers:

Please Note: The editor of White Refugee blog is a member of the Ecology of Peace culture.

Summary of Ecology of Peace Problem Solving: The problems of poverty, unemployment, war, crime, violence, food shortages, food price increases, inflation, police brutality, political instability, loss of civil rights, vanishing species, garbage and pollution, urban sprawl, traffic jams, toxic waste, racism, sexism, Nazism, Islamism, feminism, Zionism etc; are the ecological overshoot consequences of humans living in accordance to a Masonic War is Peace international law social contract that provides humans the ‘right to breed and consume’ with total disregard for ecological carrying capacity limits.

Ecology of Peace factual reality: 1. Earth is not flat; 2. Resources are finite; 3. When humans breed or consume above ecological carrying capacity limits, it results in resource conflict; 4. If individuals, families, tribes, races, religions, and/or nations want to reduce class, racial and/or religious local, national and international resource war conflict; they should cooperate to implement an Ecology of Peace international law social contract that restricts all the worlds citizens to breed and consume below ecological carrying capacity limits; to sustainably protect and conserve natural resources.

EoP v WiP NWO negotiations are documented at MILED Clerk Notice.

Wednesday, January 6, 2010

SA's Inconvenient Truth: False Hopes About 2010 World Cup?





Development and Dreams: The urban legacy of the 2010 Football World Cup; By Udesh Pillay, Richard Tomlinson, Orli Bass (eds)

The urban legacy of the 2010 Football World Cup considers the effects of South Africa's hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup. It is held that here lies the greatest potential benefit of the 2010 World Cup - a repudiation of Afropessimism and an assertion of a contemporary African identity both at home and on a global stage.

The contributors to this volume, both academics and practitioners, provide an interdisciplinary perspective on the probable consequences of the World Cup for the economy of South Africa and its cities, on infrastructure development, and on the projection of African culture and identity.

Dr Udesh Pillay is Executive Director of the Centre for Service Delivery at the HSRC. He holds a PhD in Geography from the University of Minnesota. Professor Richard Tomlinson is Chair of Urban Planning in the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning at the University of Melbourne. Prior to joining the University of Melbourne, he was Visiting Professor at the School of Architecture and Planning at the University of the Witwatersrand. Dr Orli Bass is with the Centre for Critical Research on Race and Identity at the University of KwaZulu-Natal.





New 2010 World Cup Documentary, Fahrenheit 2010, Casts Doubt on “Development through Sport” (Video)

Karen, HSRC
December 15th, 2009



Cape Town is set to sign away the R4.5bn Green Point super-stadium
... for the whopping ‘rental’ of: R1 per year.
Refugees pay more to rent a tin shack in Kayelitsha!
[World Cup 2010 Stadium's Going to Haemorrhage Money.. ]
[Meet SA's new Big Five...White Elephant 2010 WC Stadiums]
[S.S. ZA-Titanic Charging Full Speed Ahead to 2010 World Cup Iceberg..]

Are false hopes about the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa’s own inconvenient truth?

A timely HSRC Press publication, Development and Dreams: The urban legacy of the 2010 Football World Cup, asks precisely this question - one that is reinforced by a new World Cup documentary recently in the news.

Written and directed by Craig Tanner, Fahrenheit 2010 presents the advent of the world’s largest soccer spectacle in SA in an unflattering light

» » » » [HSRC Press]




Development and Dreams: The urban legacy of the 2010 Football World Cup

Udesh Pillay, Richard Tomlinson, Orli Bass (eds)
HSRC Press



Development and Dreams: The urban legacy of the 2010 Football World Cup; By Udesh Pillay, Richard Tomlinson, Orli Bass (eds)
[*Kalahari*]

The urban legacy of the 2010 Football World Cup considers the effects of South Africa's hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup. It is held that here lies the greatest potential benefit of the 2010 World Cup - a repudiation of Afropessimism and an assertion of a contemporary African identity both at home and on a global stage.

The contributors to this volume, both academics and practitioners, provide an interdisciplinary perspective on the probable consequences of the World Cup for the economy of South Africa and its cities, on infrastructure development, and on the projection of African culture and identity.

Attention is given to a range of topics including the management, costs and benefits associated with the 2010 World Cup, the uncertain economic and employment benefits, venue selection, and investment in infrastructure, tourism and fan parks. The contributors then explore the less tangible hopes, dreams and aspirations associated with the 2010 World Cup and interrogate what it means to talk about an African Cup, African culture and identity. Academics, policy-makers and the reading public will find this title an invaluable companion as South Africa prepares to host the world's largest sporting event.


Podcast Overview:

In this first part of a four-part podcast package, Dr Udesh Pillay, executive director of the Centre for Service Delivery at the HSRC and a co-editor of the volume, explains the central hypothesis with which the book began and his co-editor, Dr Orli Bass, looks at the intangible benefits that the World Cup may offer South Africa. To access the other three parts click here.

Duration: 8 min 02 sec


Reviews:

“Post-apartheid South Africa’s first, major, opening-gambit on the global roulette wheel of international sporting events and marketing exposure happens in 2010.What are the likely costs and benefits, and the social issues? This book includes a balanced and largely unsentimental mix of assessments of South Africa’s prospects in these regards. It is based upon the most important independent research on this subject.”
- Dr Jeff McCarthy, Senior Consultant, Centre for Development and Enterprise

“At this moment of economic crisis, political transition and deepening social polarisation, the 2010 World Cup represents a barbed opportunity for South Africa. Given what is at stake, we owe a huge debt to the authors of this comprehensive, engaged and creative work. I have no doubt it will become the touchstone of a much needed national conversation that should be read by all concerned.”
- Prof Edgar Pieterse, Director of the African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town

“A solid contribution to a variety of fields of research on mega-events that introduces new perspectives with a uniquely South African angle and an important record of research which will contribute substantially to encouraging further public and academic engagement on the path to 2010 and beyond.”
- Glen Robbins, School of Development Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal and freelance consultant on regional and local economic development


Authors:
Dr Udesh Pillay is Executive Director of the Centre for Service Delivery at the HSRC. He holds a PhD in Geography from the University of Minnesota. Prior to joining the HSRC, he was Head of the Delimitation and Planning Directorate of the Independent Electoral Commission and prior to that, a senior manager at The Centre for Development and Enterprise.

Professor Richard Tomlinson is Chair of Urban Planning in the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning at the University of Melbourne. Prior to joining the University of Melbourne, he was Visiting Professor at the School of Architecture and Planning at the University of the Witwatersrand. Some of the research for this volume was conducted while he was a Visiting Scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution and at the New School University. At the time that this book was being completed he was on sabbatical and a Visiting Professor at Columbia University.

Dr Orli Bass is with the Centre for Critical Research on Race and Identity at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. She was previously a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Centre for Service Delivery at the HSRC. She holds a PhD in Environmental and Geographical Science from the University of Cape Town. Her areas of research interest include the relationships between cities and culture; representations of Africa and its cities; and mega-events and cities.


Contents:

The Build-up
1 Introduction
Richard Tomlinson, Orli Bass and Udesh Pillay

2 The road to Africa: South Africa’s hosting of the ‘African’ World Cup
Justin van der Merwe

3 Managing the alchemy of the 2010 Football World Cup
Glynn Davies

Development
4 South Africa 2010: Initial dreams and sobering economic perspectives
Stan du Plessis and Wolfgang Maennig

5 Mega-events as a response to poverty reduction: The 2010 World Cup and urban development
Udesh Pillay and Orli Bass

6 Anticipating 2011
Richard Tomlinson

7 Venue selection and the 2010 World Cup: A case study of Cape Town
Kamilla Swart and Urmilla Bob

8 Sport, mega-events and urban tourism: Exploring the patterns, constraints and prospects of the 2010 World Cup
Scarlett Cornelissen

9 The 2010 World Cup and the rural hinterland: Maximising advantage from mega-events
Doreen Atkinson

10 Public viewing areas: Urban interventions in the context of mega-events
Christoph Haferburg, Theresa Golka and Marie Selter

11 In the shadow of 2010: Democracy and displacement in the Greater Ellis Park Development project
Claire Bénit-Gbaffou

Dreams
12 Urban dreams: The 2010 Football World Cup and expectations of benefit in Johannesburg
André Czeglédy

13 Aiming for Africa: Durban, 2010 and notions of African urban identity
Orli Bass

14 The offside rule: Women’s bodies in masculinised spaces
Margot Rubin

15 A World Cup and the construction of African reality
André Czeglédy

16 Synthesis
Udesh Pillay
» » » » [HSRC]

Share

No comments:

FLEUR-DE-LIS HUMINT :: F(x) Population Growth x F(x) Declining Resources = F(x) Resource Wars

KaffirLilyRiddle: F(x)population x F(x)consumption = END:CIV
Human Farming: Story of Your Enslavement (13:10)
Unified Quest is the Army Chief of Staff's future study plan designed to examine issues critical to current and future force development... - as the world population grows, increased global competition for affordable finite resources, notably energy and rare earth materials, could fuel regional conflict. - water is the new oil. scarcity will confront regions at an accelerated pace in this decade.
US Army: Population vs. Resource Scarcity Study Plan
Human Farming Management: Fake Left v. Right (02:09)
ARMY STRATEGY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT: Office of Dep. Asst. of the Army Environment, Safety and Occupational Health: Richard Murphy, Asst for Sustainability, 24 October 2006
2006: US Army Strategy for Environment
CIA & Pentagon: Overpopulation & Resource Wars [01] [02]
Peak NNR: Scarcity: Humanity’s Last Chapter: A Comprehensive Analysis of Nonrenewable Natural Resource (NNR) Scarcity’s Consequences, by Chris Clugston
Peak Non-Renewable Resources = END:CIV Scarcity Future
Race 2 Save Planet :: END:CIV Resist of Die (01:42) [Full]
FAIR USE NOTICE: The White Refugee blog contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to provide information for research and educational purposes, and advance understanding for the Canadian Immigration & Refugee Board's (IRB) ‘White Refugee’ ruling. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. Copyright owners who object to the fair use of their copyright news reports, may submit their objections to White Refugee Blog at: [jmc.pa.tf(at)gmail(dot)com]