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Ecology of Peace factual reality: 1. Earth is not flat; 2. Resources are finite; 3. When humans breed or consume above ecological carrying capacity limits, it results in resource conflict; 4. If individuals, families, tribes, races, religions, and/or nations want to reduce class, racial and/or religious local, national and international resource war conflict; they should cooperate to implement an Ecology of Peace international law social contract that restricts all the worlds citizens to breed and consume below ecological carrying capacity limits; to sustainably protect and conserve natural resources.

EoP v WiP NWO negotiations are documented at MILED Clerk Notice.

Thursday, November 5, 2009

SA Farm Attack Report [00]: Table of Contents




Report of the Committee of Enquiry into Farm Attacks, 31 July 2003






Report of the Committee of Enquiry into Farm Attacks

31 July 2003


TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. THE APPOINTMENT OF THE COMMITTEE
    • Historical background
    • Composition of Committee of Inquiry
    • Terms of reference
    • Definition of farm attacks
    • Methodology

  2. INCIDENCE AND NATURE OF FARM ATTACKS
    • Introduction
    • Incidence of farm attacks and murders
    • Nature of farm attacks
    • Victims of farm attacks

  3. EXAMPLES OF FARM ATTACKS
    • Introduction
    • Cases on the NOCOC database
    • Analysis

  4. CASE STUDIES: DIRECT ATTACKS
    • Introduction
    • Case studies
    • Analysis of case studies

  5. CASE STUDIES: LAND INVASIONS
    • Introduction
    • Mangete
    • Nonoti
    • Nqabeni
    • Verulam - Hazelmere
    • Kranskop
    • Other cases in KwaZulu-Natal
    • Modderklip
    • Comments

  6. VICTIMS OF FARM ATTACKS
    • Introduction
    • Interviews with farmers and their families
    • Interviews with farm workers
    • The trauma of farm attacks
    • Conclusions

  7. PERPETRATORS OF FARM ATTACKS
    • Introductions
    • Results of the interviews
    • Case studies
    • Conclusions

  8. INVESTIGATING OFFICERS AND PROSECUTORS
    • Introduction
    • Incidence and nature of farm attacks
    • Investigation of farm attacks
    • Prevention of farm attacks
    • Interviews with prosecutors
    • Conclusions

  9. SUBMISSIONS TO THE COMMITTEE
    • Introduction
    • Organised agriculture
    • Security force
    • Government departments and non-governmental organisations
    • Submissions by individuals
    • Comments

  10. LITERATURE REVIEW
    • Introductions
    • Reports by security force and intelligence
    • Causes of farm attacks and the prevention thereof
    • Farm attacks in relation to the land issue
    • Relationships between farmers and farm workers
    • The Rural Safety Plan

  11. THE FARMING COMMUNITY
    • Introduction
    • Farmers
    • Farm workers
    • Agricultural organisations
    • Conclusions

  12. CRIME AND ITS CAUSES IN SOUTH AFRICA
    • Introduction
    • Crime patterns 1980 - 1993
    • Crime patterns 1994 - 2000
    • South African crime in an international context
    • Reasons for high crime rates
    • Criminal violence and rural safety in KwaZulu-Natal

  13. THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM AND FARM PROTECTION
    • Introductions
    • Overview of the criminal justice system
    • Policing: prevention and detection of crime
    • Prosecution performance
    • The courts
    • Prisons

  14. COMPARATIVE STUDIES
    • Introduction
    • Cash-in-transit robberies
    • House robberies in urban areas
    • Conclusions

  15. LEGISLATION ON LAND AND LAND REFORM
    • Introduction
    • Land policy and legislation
    • Land reform progress

  16. SECURITY ON FARMS AND SMALLHOLDINGS
    • Introduction
    • Study by Chief Joint Operations
    • Study by CIAC, Eastern Cape
    • The need for increased security
    • Safeguarding property
    • Personal protection
    • High risk factors

  17. TRAUMA AND ITS TREATMENT
    • Introduction
    • The nature of trauma
    • The need for treatment
    • The nature of treatment
    • Recommendations

  18. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
    • Summary of the Report
    • Opsomming van die Verslag
    • List of oral submissions
    • List of written submissions
    • Bibliography



LIST OF TABLES

Farm Murders in South Africa (Carte Blanche 1/2)

Farm Murders in South Africa (Carte Blanche 2/2)

  1. Farm attacks registered by SAAU / Agri SA: 1991-1997
  2. Farm attacks registered by CIAC: 1997-2001
  3. Farm attacks registered by NOCOC: 1998-2001
  4. Farm attacks per province: 1998-2001 (CIAC)
  5. Murders committed during farm attacks per province: 1998-2001 (CIAC)
  6. Average murder rate per incident: 1998-2001
  7. Farm attacks: 2001 to 2002 (CIAC)
  8. Crimes committed during farm attacks as percentage of crimes in general
  9. Ratio between attacks on farms and on smallholdings: 2001 (CIAC)
  10. Ratio between attacks on farms and on smallholdings: 1998-2001 (NOCOC)
  11. Monthly distribution of farm attacks: 1998-2001 (CIAC)
  12. Daily distribution of farm attacks: 2000-2001 (CIAC)
  13. Hourly distribution of farm attacks: 2000 (CIAC)
  14. Hourly distribution of farm attacks: 2001 (CIAC)
  15. Place where farm attacks occurred: 2001 (CIAC)
  16. Most prevalent crimes registered as a proportion of all farm attacks: 2001
  17. Specific offences as a proportion of the total number of victims: 2001
  18. Victims of farm attacks killed or injured 2001
  19. Victims raped during farm attacks: 1998-2001 (NOCOC database)
  20. Primary weapons used during farm attacks: 2001
  21. Property robbed in farm attacks: 2001
  22. Apparent motives for farm attacks: 1998-2001 (NOCOC database)
  23. Involvment of farm workers in attacks: 1998-2001 (NOCOC)
  24. Race of victims of farm attacks: 2001 (CIAC)
  25. Race of victims of farm attacks: 1998-2001 (NOCOC database)
  26. Race of victims of rapes during farm attacks: 1998-2001 (NOCOC)
  27. Age of victims of farm attacks: 2001 (CIAC)
  28. Gender of victims of farm attacks: 2001 (CIAC)
  29. Status of victims of farm attacks: 2001 (CIAC)
  30. Employment in the agricultural sector by race 2001
  31. Percentage change in the number of crimes recorded over 4-year periods
    between 1981/82 and 1993.
  32. Percentage change in the number of crimes recorded over 4-year periods
    between 1994 and 2000.
  33. The National Operational Coordinating Mechanism Structure.
  34. Rates of injuries and deaths as a proportion of number of incidents of farm
    attacks and cash-in-transit robberies: 2000 - 2001
  35. Injuries and deaths as a proportion of the number of victims of farm attacks
    and cash-in-transit robberies: 2001.
  36. House robberies on farms and urban areas.
  37. Time of attack indicated in percentages.
  38. Attacks during the day and night.
  39. Place of first contact between the attacker and the victim.
  40. Method used by the attacker to approach the victims.
  41. Method of entry used by the attacker.
  42. Weapons used by the attacker.
  43. Victims injured.
  44. Nature of the injuries suffered by the victim.
  45. Victims tied up.
  46. Items stolen as a percentage of incidents.
  47. Race of the victims.
  48. Age group of the victims.
  49. Number of attackers.
  50. Race and gender of the attacker.
  51. Age of the attacker.
  52. Docket disposal as a percentage.
  53. Security levels in Eastern Cape compared with national figures.



LIST OF FIGURES

  1. Attacks on farms and smallholdings
  2. Number of commercial farming units in RSA: 1996
  3. Number of commercial farm workers in RSA: 1996
  4. Percentage change in the number of crimes recorded: 1994 - 2000 and 1999 - 2000
  5. Violent and property crime rates in selected police areas: 1999
  6. Cases detected as a proportion of recorded cases: 2000.
  7. Number of residents per functional police officer by province: October 2001
  8. Cases resulting in a conviction as a proportion of cases prosecuted: 2000
  9. Cases processed by the prosecution service: 1996 - 2002
  10. Average number of days unsentenced prisoners are incarcerated: 1999 - 2000



FOREWORD

Farm Murders in South Africa - SkyNews

Min. of Safety and Security: Charles Ngakula: 'If you don't like the crime, leave the country'

The Report of the Committee of Inquiry into Farm Attacks has been a long time in the making. The Committee was appointed on 4 April 2001, and it was then hoped that it would be able to bring out its findings before the end of that year. It became clear to the Commmittee very quickly that it could not do so. There were many reports and other literature on farm attacks in existence already, and to bring out another one quickly, would have served no purpose at all. The Committee would only have laid itself open to accusations of superficiality. Furthermore, much of the previous work done was also responsible for some incorrect perceptions about farm attacks, and the Committee therefore decided not only to conduct its own research, but also to evaluate the work done already.

Unfortunately, much of the statistical information that the Committee required simply was not available at the time. In fact, many of the statistics used in this Report only became available after its appointment, and some were received as late as 2003. Some of the statistical information was assembled specifically at the request of the Committee, for which it wishes to thank the Crime Information Analysis Centre of the SAPS, both its head office in Pretoria as well as its provincial office in the Eastern Cape. Chief Joint Operations of the SANDF also produced useful statistics.

The Committee also wishes to thank all the other contributors - bodies or persons who made verbal and written submissions, or gave up their time for interviews. Some of them did so at their own personal expense, and spent much time in preparation. They are too many to mention. Some of their contributions are not mentioned or acknowledged in this Report. That is only for lack of space, and the contributions are all highly appreciated. The Committee also wishes to express its appreciation for the assistance it received from the office of the Component: Operational Coordination of the SAPS in Pretoria, where the Committee performed most of its formal work. Many of their staff also gave much of their time.

This report is not going to satisfy everybody, and will challenge firmly held convictions of many interested persons and institutions. Farm attacks are not a simple phenomenon. They have many causes - some direct and some indirect. Furthermore, there are many precipitating factors leading to farm attacks, and there are many reasons why farm attacks happen the way they do. The Committee has analysed the phenomenon of farm attacks to the best of its abilities, and all possible sources of information have been examined thoroughly.

The wish of the Committee is that the readers of this report accept that the Committee has tried to be as comprehensive, unbiased and objective as possible.

Finally, the Committee would have liked to publish this Report also in Afrikaans, since many, if not most, of its readers will be from the Afrikaans speaking community. Due to constraints of time that is not possible. The Committee therefore decided to have a fairly comprehensive summary in both Afrikaans and English at the end of the Report. The usual executive summary is therefore omitted.





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